Tag Archives: Tabletop

Changeling: The Lost- Venice Unmasked

A few days ago we here at CHG  were surprised to discover that we had been awarded a free copy of a Changeling: The Lost sourcebook from the Storytellers Vault by the name of Venice Unmasked, written by Christopher Handley. So, keeping in mind what I had learned from the new edition (or perhaps, completely forgetting it and getting swept up by a True Fae), I decided to take a look. But perhaps, I am getting ahead of myself: what is the Storytellers Vault? I had never heard of it before.

What I learned is that the Vault is, for the lack of a better term, the fan module publishing service (much like the DM’s Guild for D&D). People who sign up are given access to the IP for White Wolf, and they are allowed to publish sourcebooks based on locations or different time periods through the auspices of the “Storytellers Vault” branding for 50% royalties. It appears to be a win-win: White Wolf has had an extensive history of farming out chapters of books for freelancers, so why wouldn’t they let the market dictate what sourcebooks are popular and which aren’t? They get some royalty money for little to no effort, and the devoted author gets to use an IP they comfortable with and passionate about and get a decent slice of royalties for their work.

I address the fact that this is an fan written setting for a simple reason: I honestly could not tell while I was reading it. The layout was nearly identical to CtL 1st edition, with subsections neatly stored within the columns. There was artwork that I am sure was in the 2nd edition core, along with a lot of gorgeous original art that reminds me of Dave McKean’s covers for Sandman. Apart from one small typo, I couldn’t see a single book design flaw in it. Venice is a city that Handley cares a great deal about, enough so that he takes time to mention that this is where he was engaged and where he was married. Venice Unmasked is a labor of love, both for the city, and for his passion for gaming.

Venice Unmasked begins with a fairly long backstory (again, hardly unusual for a White Wolf product), going through the history of Venice from the days of refugees from the fall of Rome, to an independent city-state, its rise to one of the most vital cities in Christendom during the crusades, its fall to Napoleon, and how it fell by the wayside during the industrial revolution, coming to be known for its glamor and art. In the end, it’s the glamor, art, legends, and traditions of Venetian history and life that come into play. Changeling is a game that relies heavily on the idea that all stories are true (in some fashion), traditions accomplish something, and old bargains are sacred. The historical sections are filled with these legends and rituals. For instance, the fact that starting in the Dark Ages (and continuing to this day) the ruler of Venice (now mayor) attends the Marriage to the Sea every year, a ritual where a consecrated ring is cast into the waters to “wed” the city to the sea, which had provided the city dominance for so long. There is a legend about a man whose daughter was promised that she would become “like the Madonna” if she hid a communion wafer for 10 days, only for it to bring nothing but hardship on the family. Mostly importantly though, Venice Unmasked delights in one of the most famous events in the city, the Venetian Carnival.

While Carnival has pagan roots, it gained traction in the middle ages as a festival before Lent, with a number of similarities that Americans might associate with Mardi Gras: a time to finish off the wine and rich food that would go bad if left for 40 days of fasting, a feast culminating with a grand festival where people of all status would don masks and celebrate, where you would never know who was whom. People could use the opportunity of this anonymity to do a number of things: dodge creditors, speak their thoughts freely, assassinate a rival. For those following along with the general plot of Changeling: The Lost, wearing a mask that hides your true nature and pretending that you are something else while engaging in bargains in secret is a huge part of the game, and Handley nicely dovetails that into what makes Venice special, creating a unique metaphysical setting.

For the Changelings of Venice, a different Court is in session: The Court of Carnival. Due to the intervention of Changelings loyal to their old masters, the protections that the Seasonal Courts had maintained had been weakened and bypassed, and the True Fae were able to hunt their former Lost once again so that they could be re-enslaved. Desperate, one nameless Changeling made a deal with Carnival itself, cutting off his own face to become the Doge. While the individual Seasonal Courts still exist and have their own factions, the Doge is the ruler of the city. Around him, Masks appear over every Changeling that override their true appearance. Everyone in the Doge’s Court is truly anonymous, though different Court positions carry special masks that correspond to their duty … which happen to correspond to the roles in the Italian Commedia dell’arte, street performances with a bunch of stock characters that companies would make up shows for. (The Renaissance version of the English Punch and Judy shows).

While each Court has its own factions, the Doge can come from any of them…the problem is that becoming the Doge makes you so anonymous no one can remember who you were. As a result, though everyone is under the same banner of “Let’s not get taken back by our old masters”, everyone has their own way of thinking how best that should be done. Unlike the Seasonal Courts, where every faction takes a turn in charge, the Doge rules over all…and no one can remember where the Doge came from, and what his or her (or its) loyalties are. On the up side, no conspirator against the Freehold can be sure that the person he is conspiring with in on his side, which makes betraying anyone rather difficult.

It’s a pretty uneasy alliance. Spring doesn’t like that its typical time of celebration is being cut into by forty days of fasting, Summer can’t remember who is in charge but thinks that it should be one of their own, Autumn is engaged in a spy competition with the Doge’s own, and Winter doesn’t like the flashy show. As I read through it, I see wisps of connection to how Vampire games are played … and I’m alright with that. The overall plot is still PvE, but I am happy to see wrinkles of intrigue set into the system.

There are mechanical groundworks that the book lays down. They are set in First Edition, even though the book was published in 2019 (I assume this is a combination of IP restrictions, and the relative youth of Second Edition) but overall the changes are minor, andsince the book is more background and story based GMs should be able to modify what hard systems numbers exist into the new setting. For the most part, the most direct changes to any mechanics would be in the Mantle and Contract of Carnival. The more ranks in Mantle, the harder your character is to place. Contracts with Carnival tend to embody aspects of the event itself. Especially notable, and potentially game changing, is the five dot contract (what would likely be the equivalent of a Royal Contract in 2E) called Farewell to the Flesh, where a successful role on the target (including another person) inverts their place on the morality track. Note that I didn’t say for a Changeling. It works for any applicable character who has a morality track in the White Wolf franchise: Humanity for Vampires, Harmony for Werewolves, Wisdom for Mages. An Elder Methuselah, creatures millenia old who has long since abandoned even the vestiges of being human can be made, for a time, more human than human. It is expensive, and certainly not a one hit kill, but the idea makes for some wonderfully interesting cross system play.

The rest of the book is made up of characters for players to interact with, and story hooks. Again, all of the characters are drummed up using 1st edition rules, but with a little bit of legwork, they could be adopted into 2nd edition with few or any problems. More important is their narrative purpose: the factions that make up the Seasonal Courts, their motivations, and what they might try to do without player intervention or interaction. Overall, it’s a valid resource for a setting.


For me, Venice Unmasked sets a pleasant bar for fan works in White Wolf properties. Even if your campaign doesn’t take your players to Venice, it has a lot of cool ideas that can be grafted onto campaigns. Furthermore, it provides a really cool example for other prospective designers. Is there a festival or something else truly unique about the city you want to base your game around? Why shouldn’t you make a special event with it? Why shouldn’t an excited and passionate GM make an event in game where rules are turned on their heads, and when conspiracies and plots boil over? If anything, I believe this is the greatest gift that Venice Unmasked offers: inspiration to go beyond and let GMs do their thing.

 

For those interested, Venice Unmasked is available for purchase on DriveThruRPG. Like what Cannibal Halfling Gaming is doing and want to help us bring games and gamers together? First, you can tell your friends about us! You can say hello on our Discord channel!  Finally, you can support us directly on Patreon, which lets us cover costs, pay our contributors, and save up for projects. Thanks for reading!

Meet the Campaign: Post-The Last Jedi

Maybe it’s because I’m in dire need of a fix before Episode IX is released, but I find myself drifting back to the end of The Last Jedi. I know that it’s a polarizing topic for a lot of fans, but I keep thinking of the possibilities and implications left by the ending. The interesting part is, going at the question of “How Do I Build a Campaign?”, previous Star Wars Meet the Campaigns have created a location and then built up hooks around it. This method doesn’t work as well for something as broad as the entire galaxy. It might be simpler to have a GM pick a planet and say “this is what is happening here”, but unless we are talking about a popular setting like Nar Shaddaa, a write up for places of interest is less useful because there is little to keep players there without railroading them.

So, after some thought, I’ve decided to try coming at this from the other direction: rather than picking a location and populating it with plot hooks, this Meet the Campaign is setting up themes and using bits and pieces from throughout the system in order to build a framework that spurs a wide background of characters into the action. Unlike the previous entries, this installment is system specific for Fantasy Flight’s Star Wars RPG, but the themes are universal (or galactic) enough to be transferred over. And just to be sure, as this takes place after the events of The Last Jedi, spoilers will abound, so consider yourself warned.

Continue reading Meet the Campaign: Post-The Last Jedi

Changeling the Lost: Second Edition

The political kingmaker is the fairest of them all, with a designer suit, a killer intellect, and a smile that will make men follow her anywhere. She is a master of the boardroom and has a knack for deal making, even when the terms seem a bit, well, strange. If you agree to them in jest, you may be surprised when you are compelled to follow through. The bartender is a short man, barely noticeable behind the counter. He’s quick with a smile, and a drink, and is always willing to hear a gripe or a complaint, and offer a quick word of comfort to the concerned bar patron. What is odd is the number of filled shot glasses he keeps over the lintel as a marker. The private eye has streaks of grey throughout his raven black hair. His eyes are quick and dart to the sides wildly. His smile, while charming, seems to have a few too many teeth. He’s been following up on a number of abusive husband cases lately. It’s a bit odd how so many have seemed to disappear, but no body, no crime. It might seem as if all of these characters have nothing in common, were it not for their  enemy: the beings who took them away to a far off land, and who may come to take them again. And for that, these Changelings will join together to stay alive.

Continue reading Changeling the Lost: Second Edition

System Split: L5R AEG 4e and FFG

Memories are a powerful thing. They define much of who and what we are, and even when the edges become hazy some things, some impressions, remain crystal clear in our psyches. I can’t remember how long ago it was (though math tells me that we are pushing 20 years now), but I can remember who I was with and what we were doing (trying the dangerous addiction that is Magic: The Gathering)  when I was first introduced to my Friendly Local Game Store. Looking back, it was dingy and in a sketchy part of the neighborhood, but I would wind up spending so much time there over the years that I can’t help but look back at it with fondness.

It was on one of those trips that I was saw something that caught my eye: a card game that I hadn’t seen before, but whose art reminded me of some of the new cartoons I was seeing at the time. I wound up buying a pack and trying out the game and, I had no idea what I had stumbled into. I played for a while, found some of the tie-in novels, and largely forgot about it as a part of my adolescence that I would likely never see again. Suddenly, in the last six months, Legend of the Five Rings (commonly referred to as L5R) came back into my life. I not only found that there a Tabletop RPG version of the franchise, I found myself playing in two different editions: the 4th edition, originally published by the original creators Alderac Entertainment Group, and the new version created by Fantasy Flight Gaming. I found myself marveling at how different they were, and yet, how strong of a fanbase I found for each. After having played a bit of both, it seemed worthwhile to look at some of the pivot points at which the game changes.

Continue reading System Split: L5R AEG 4e and FFG

Advance Review: Shadow of the Century

A few years ago, on a truly crappy day, I had the saving grace of being introduced to an independent short film by the name of Kung Fury. For those unfamiliar, it was a wonderful bit of over the top, profane 80’s cheese: a Kung Fu Master/detective who is a lone wolf is forced to team up with his new partner Triceracop as they take on sinister transforming arcade machines/killer robots, Laser Raptors, and a Time Traveling Adolf Hitler…who wants to own the title of “Kung Fuhrer”. All complete with poor VCR tracking to boot.

Image result for kung fury

(It’s a lot like this)

I say all this because I have found a new tabletop game to support any GM who looked at all this and went, “I would love to run something in here”: Shadow of the Century, written by Brian Engard, Stephen Blackmoore, and Morgan Ellis and published by Evil Hat Productions.

Continue reading Advance Review: Shadow of the Century

Masks at PAX: Interview with Brendan Conway and Scion Playtest

In case that is wasn’t obvious from our Reviews, Adventure Logs, and Table Fiction, many of the writers here at Cannibal Halfling gaming are huge fans of the products from Magpie Games, Masks: A New Generation in particular. Seamus previously had the opportunity to interview the developer, Brendan Conway back in 2017, but since then Magpie has released several new supplements that fleshed out the universe, added new playbooks for players, and even offered new storylines to match different genres. With all these changes, we wanted to know more about what went into them, and what fans might see in the future. As luck would have it, Brendon was attending PAX Unplugged to help promote the newest expansion, Masks: Unbound, and he was gracious enough to take some time to speak with me.


Continue reading Masks at PAX: Interview with Brendan Conway and Scion Playtest

Table Fiction: High Impact Heroes, the Backstory: Morgan “Showtime” Teller

Greetings! For those of you who have been checking out our High Impact Heroics Adventure Log, you recently were treated to the backstory of Gil Phillips, the Beacon. Continuing the trend of, “How did we get here?”, our prologue revealed that the team broke some rules during their first teamup and got the attention of The Lawman. So, here is a little window into how that began, through the eyes of Morgan Teller, the Delinquent.

Continue reading Table Fiction: High Impact Heroes, the Backstory: Morgan “Showtime” Teller

Tachyon Squadron Review

There’s always been a bit of mystique and fascination with fighter pilots from the days of the Red Baron, so it should be no surprise that there has been a fascination with those same tight dogfights IN SPAAAAAAAACE!!! Space fighters have been a big part of the Space Opera for decades, popping up in places as varied as the venerable Mobile Suit Gundam and Macross  franchises (as forerunners to the famous mecha), to harder sci-fi novels such as the LAC’s in Honor Harrington, but probably the biggest exposure has come through Star Wars, with starfighter v. starfighter combat being staples of the movies, the well loved X-wing and TIE Fighter franchises, and a long stretch of novels in the Expanded Universe that brought fans fleshed out and loved characters in the form of Wedge Antilles and Corran Horn. And so the concept of these  awesome space fights has been brought to us in tabletop form by our good friends over at Evil Hat with their new installment, Tachyon Squadron!

Continue reading Tachyon Squadron Review

Adventure Log: The Flight of the Albatross Part 4

Now, safely back onboard the Albatross after the adventure with the Chimax, the crew was able to interrogate Krrsh. It didn’t take too much prompting to get him to spill the whole story: he had been the Captain of one of the ships that attacked Clarke, onboard an S-class Scout ship. He wasn’t part of the job on Toprol, so he had decided to stray off to make a bit of side money. On his trip he had stumbled across a merchant vessel, one that he thought would have been an easy kill. As it turned out, he was mistaken in his assumption: the trader held a set of concealed guns, and when Krrsh had ordered the ship to cut thrust and prepare for boarding, the merchant ship and opened up a broadside at almost point blank range. Krrsh had managed to get the ship out of the firefight and held it together long enough to make a jump to the next rendezvous point. However, the other two captains, Ferrik Redthane and Miria Silverhand were none to happy at his misadventure, which had rendered the Scout ship useless for pirating and as a punishment had marooned him on the ancient station as a warning to the others.

Continue reading Adventure Log: The Flight of the Albatross Part 4